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READING: LANCET ON RELIGION AND HEALTH
In 2015, The Lancet published a collection of articles on religion and public health in development contexts.
STUDY: FAITH-BASED PROVIDERS IN GHANA FOR UHC
We are conducting a 3-year research project (2015-2018) with colleagues in Ghana funded by the WHO’s AHPSR – looking at the historical relationship between faith-based providers and the Ghanaian public health system for universal health coverage.
READING: STAKEHOLDER HEALTH
Teresa Cutts and James Cochrane edited a new book called ‘Stakeholder Health: Insights from New Systems of Health’ - which reviews best practices in the areas of community health improvement, as well as clinical and community partnerships.
READING: SPECIAL EDITION OF RFIA
The Review of Faith and International Affairs Fall 2016 edition has a collection of articles on religion and sustainable development worth a read – edited by Jill Olivier and including a Guest Introduction by UNAIDS’ Michel Sidibe.

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An international collaborative working on religion within health and community systems
Seeking to strengthen evidence on the functioning of religiously-inspired health institutions and communities within their contextualized health systems, especially in development settings

Our work includes:

  • Facilitating interdisciplinary research on the intersection between religion, public health and development
  • A focus on health systems and policy
  • Building capacity in research-practitioners, especially in development contexts
  • Multi-sectoral networking
  • Development and dissemination of research materials and tools
  • Research and evaluation of key projects and initiatives

IRHAP functions as an open international collaborative – loosely linking colleagues working to build evidence on the interface of religion and health systems research and practice.

IRHAP also directly coordinates and conducts research and post-graduate training out of the Health Policy and Systems Division within the School of Public Health and Family Medicine at the University of Cape Town.

IRHAP understands 'religion' to be inclusive of the broad range of faiths and cultures through which people interpret health and healing - including mainstream religious traditions, as well as traditional and alternative practices.

We do not promote or prescribe to any particular tradition - and the mapping of religious health assets is conducted with a full understanding of the often harmful influence of religious practices and interpretations on health.

However we hold a shared belief that in many development contexts, religion remains important to health and health systems - and therefore needs to be understood better through interdisciplinary research and collaborative practice.